Learn More

clEAR Games

General Overview

The auditory brain training games provide training in seven categories that are important for successful listening:

  • Phoneme discrimination
  • Most frequently used words in the language
  • Auditory attention
  • Auditory processing speed
  • Auditory working memory
  • Bound morpheme discrimination
  • Discourse comprehension
  • The goal of training phoneme discrimination is to develop patients’ abilities to make phonetic distinctions because phoneme confusion is a common source of difficulty for people with hearing loss. An example would be distinguishing the word “mat” from the word “bat.”
  • The goal of training the most frequently occurring words in the language is to develop patients’ abilities to recognize words that are likely to occur during everyday conversations (i.e. the words “boy” and “chair”).
  • The goal of training auditory attention is to develop patients’ abilities to extract meaningful speech from a background of competing speech babble, as they might be required to do when listening in a noisy restaurant or at a family dinner table.
  • The goal of training auditory processing speed is to develop patients’ abilities to recognize speech quickly. This is important because during everyday conversation, one word follows another in rapid succession and words must be recognized quickly.
  • The goal of training auditory working memory is to develop patients’ abilities to keep words in short term memory so they can process the meaning of a word and the word in its linguistic context.
  • The goal of bound morpheme training is to develop patients’ abilities to distinguish words that vary in bound morphemes, such as “boy” versus “boys” or “can” versus “can’t.” This is vital because the presence or absence of a bound morpheme can greatly affect the meaning of an utterance.
  • The goal of training discourse comprehension is to develop patients’ abilities to comprehend connected speech and to make inferences about discourse content, because we most often hear connected speech during everyday conversations.

TreasEAR Island

In this game, the subscriber sees three pictures and must decide if the pictures they see match the three words they just heard, in the same order. The goals are to develop auditory attention by teaching the user to extract a word from background noise, to teach phoneme discrimination, and to teach recognition of the most frequently used words in the English language.

FarmEAR in the Dell

In this game, subscribers hear a word in noise and then choose the word that they heard from an array of four picture choices. The goals are to develop auditory attention by teaching the user to extract a word from background noise, to teach phoneme discrimination, and to teach recognition of the most frequently used words in the English language.

MountainEAR

In this game, subscribers see a picture and then hear a word. They must tap “yes” or “no” to determine whether or not the word matches the picture. The goal is to develop auditory processing speed.

EARonaut

In this game, subscribers hear a word and must find its picture match on the screen. The goals are to develop word memory and to teach recognition of the most frequently used words in the English language.

ShakespEARe

In this game, subscribers listen to a five-sentence paragraph and then hear each sentence separately. They must then organize the sentences back into the original order of the paragraph. The goals of this game are to develop discourse comprehension and auditory memory.

pEARl Crunch

In pEARl Crunch, subscribers hear a phrase that may contain a bound morpheme (e.g., plural “s” or negative contraction “’t”) and then must choose between two illustrations of the phrase, one with the bound morpheme and one without. They must tap “yes” or “no’ to determine if the word matches the picture. The goals are to develop auditory processing speed and the ability to attend to bound morphemes.

©2018 clEAR - customized learning: Exercises for Aural Rehabilitation